Fighting Pregnancy Discrimination in Tennessee

Unfortunately, even though discriminating on the bases of gender, age, race, and sexual orientation and even pregnancy is against the law, many people face this kind of discrimination at their workplace frequently. If you or someone you know feels like you have been discriminated at your workplace because of your race or gender or because of your pregnancy, then it is important that you speak to a Tennessee pregnancy discrimination lawyer right away. They will hear your case and make sure that you get the compensation you need for what you have been through.

According to recent news about labor and employment, pregnancy has no evidence that it keeps women from full and equal participation in the workforce, however, many employers actively or passively attempt to push pregnant women out of the workplace. The number of claims of pregnancy discrimination that go to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is increasing even with federal and state laws against discrimination.

The current pregnancy law, known as the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 prohibits employers with fifteen or more workers from discriminating based on pregnancy or childbirth. Pregnant women must be allowed to work as long as they are able, with any absences treated the same as any other disability leave. This law however does not require any accommodation to be made by the employer. This year, 2012, the EEOC plans to give employers new guidance to make clear that the 35-year-old Pregnancy Discrimination Act prevents employers from firing, refusing to hire or otherwise discriminating against a worker because she is pregnant.
There is also a proposed new act known as the Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act that was introduced to the United States in September of 2012. This act borrows the “reasonable accommodations” from the Americans with Disabilities Act. It would require accommodations for employees limited by pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions. Some of these accommodations could include: providing stools for pregnant employees whose jobs require a lot of standing, allowing pregnant workers to carry water bottles on the job, modifying lifting requirements or reassigning nonessential tasks.
The act would also prohibit employers from firing employees because of pregnancy, or requiring them to take pregnancy leave.

In Tennessee and all over the United States cases of workplace discrimination similar to this one occur too often to hard-working employees. If you or someone you work with feels that you have been terminated or discriminated against because of your race, age, gender or pregnancy, then we strongly recommend that you contact one of our caring and knowledgeable Tennessee employment discrimination attorneys immediately. We care about our clients and will work with you to see to it that you receive the compensation you deserve for the discrimination you have suffered.

Contact us online or call us at 800.705.2121 to set up a FREE consultation to discuss your legal options

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